Drug development: Allosteric inhibitors hit USP7 hard

January 16th, 2018 by Wei Zhang

Drug development: Allosteric inhibitors hit USP7 hard

Drug development: Allosteric inhibitors hit USP7 hard, Published online: 16 January 2018; doi:10.1038/nchembio.2557

A potent and specific small-molecule inhibitor of a long-sought-after anticancer drug target, USP7, that acts allosterically to inhibit MDM2-stabilizing activity foretells of more allosteric inhibitors for deubiquitinases and E3 ligases.

Errata: Continuous directed evolution of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

January 16th, 2018 by David I Bryson

Errata: Continuous directed evolution of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

Errata: Continuous directed evolution of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, Published online: 16 January 2018; doi:10.1038/nchembio0218-186

Errata: Continuous directed evolution of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

Synthetic biology: License to kill

January 16th, 2018 by Caitlin Deane

Synthetic biology: License to kill

Synthetic biology: License to kill, Published online: 16 January 2018; doi:10.1038/nchembio.2561

Synthetic biology: License to kill

Natural products: Tapping into personalized chemistry

January 16th, 2018 by Jack R Davison

Natural products: Tapping into personalized chemistry

Natural products: Tapping into personalized chemistry, Published online: 16 January 2018; doi:10.1038/nchembio.2560

By integrating metagenomics, spectroscopy and synthetic biology, the individualized chemistry of small reef-dwelling organisms and their associated microbiota can be characterized in exquisite detail, unlocking a wealth of structural diversity for the development of new drugs.

Toward an orthogonal central dogma

January 16th, 2018 by Chang C Liu

Toward an orthogonal central dogma

Toward an orthogonal central dogma, Published online: 16 January 2018; doi:10.1038/nchembio.2554

The central dogma processes of DNA replication, transcription, and translation are responsible for the maintenance and expression of every gene in an organism. An orthogonal central dogma may insulate genetic programs from host regulation and allow expansion of the roles of these processes within the cell.

Cell biology: Eaten up from the inside

January 16th, 2018 by Karin Kuehnel

Cell biology: Eaten up from the inside

Cell biology: Eaten up from the inside, Published online: 16 January 2018; doi:10.1038/nchembio.2563

Cell biology: Eaten up from the inside

Plant hormones: Metabolic end run to jasmonate

January 16th, 2018 by Gregg A Howe

Plant hormones: Metabolic end run to jasmonate

Plant hormones: Metabolic end run to jasmonate, Published online: 16 January 2018; doi:10.1038/nchembio.2553

The lipid-derived hormone jasmonate promotes durable resistance of plants to a myriad of herbivores and pathogens. New evidence reveals an alternative pathway for the terminal steps of jasmonate biosynthesis and further advances our understanding of bioactive oxylipins in the plant kingdom.

RNA Splicing: Making the cut

January 16th, 2018 by Stéphane Larochelle

RNA Splicing: Making the cut

RNA Splicing: Making the cut, Published online: 16 January 2018; doi:10.1038/nchembio.2564

RNA Splicing: Making the cut

Mechanism of intersubunit ketosynthase–dehydratase interaction in polyketide synthases

January 8th, 2018 by Matthew Jenner

Mechanism of intersubunit ketosynthase–dehydratase interaction in polyketide synthases

Mechanism of intersubunit ketosynthase–dehydratase interaction in polyketide synthases, Published online: 08 January 2018; doi:10.1038/nchembio.2549

A combination of biochemical and structural techniques allows the characterization of a novel docking domain in polyketide synthases, which is structurally disordered and facilitates association of subunits at ketosynthase–dehydratase junctions.
  • Posted in Nat Chem Biol, Publications
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Employing a biochemical protecting group for a sustainable indigo dyeing strategy

January 8th, 2018 by Tammy M Hsu

Employing a biochemical protecting group for a sustainable indigo dyeing strategy

Employing a biochemical protecting group for a sustainable indigo dyeing strategy, Published online: 08 January 2018; doi:10.1038/nchembio.2552

An environmentally friendly approach to indigo production is facilitated by the characterization of a plant indoxyl glucosyltransferase, which converts the unstable indoxyl precursor into indican by addition of a glucose protecting group.
  • Posted in Nat Chem Biol, Publications
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