[ASAP] Biological Engineered Living Materials: Growing Functional Materials with Genetically Programmable Properties

January 9th, 2019 by Charlie Gilbert, Tom Ellis

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ACS Synthetic Biology
DOI: 10.1021/acssynbio.8b00423
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[ASAP] Effector-Binding-Directed Dimerization and Dynamic Communication between Allosteric Sites of Ribonucleotide Reductase

January 8th, 2019 by Bill Pham, Richard J. Lindsay, Tongye Shen

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Biochemistry
DOI: 10.1021/acs.biochem.8b01131

A stable tetramer is not the only oligomeric state that mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding proteins can adopt. [DNA and Chromosomes]

January 7th, 2019 by Saurabh P Singh, Vandna Kukshal, Roberto Galletto

Mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding proteins (mtSSBs) are required for mitochondrial DNA replication and stability and are generally assumed to form homo-tetramers, and this species is proposed to be the one active for ssDNA binding. However, we recently reported that the mtSSB from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScRim1) forms homo-tetramers at high protein concentrations, whereas at low protein concentrations, it dissociates into dimers that bind ssDNA with high affinity . In this work, using a combination of analytical ultracentrifugation techniques and DNA binding experiments with fluorescently labeled DNA oligonucleotides, we tested whether the ability of ScRim1 to form dimers is unique among mtSSBs. Whereas human mtSSBs and those from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis formed stable homo-tetramers, the mtSSBs from Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis formed stable homo-dimers. Moreover, the mtSSBs from Candida nivariensis and Candida castellii formed tetramers at high protein concentrations, whereas at low protein concentrations they formed dimers, as did ScRim1. Mutational studies revealed that the ability to form either stable tetramers or dimers depended on a complex interplay of more than one amino acid at the dimer dimer interface and the C-terminal unstructured tail. In conclusion, our findings indicate that mtSSBs can adopt different oligomeric states, ranging from stable tetramers to stable dimers, and suggest that a dimer of mtSSB may be a physiologically relevant species that binds to ssDNA in some yeast species.

Protein circuits reprogram cells

January 7th, 2019 by Yiqian Wu

Protein circuits reprogram cells

Protein circuits reprogram cells, Published online: 07 January 2019; doi:10.1038/s41589-018-0210-5

Two protein circuit systems, split-protease-cleavable orthogonal coiled-coil logic (SPOC logic) and circuits of hacked orthogonal modular proteases (CHOMP), have been developed to permit rapid and logic function-based control of mammalian cellular signaling.

<i>Legionella</i> effector SetA as a general O-glucosyltransferase for eukaryotic proteins

January 7th, 2019 by Ling Gao

Legionella effector SetA as a general O-glucosyltransferase for eukaryotic proteins

<i>Legionella</i> effector SetA as a general O-glucosyltransferase for eukaryotic proteins, Published online: 07 January 2019; doi:10.1038/s41589-018-0189-y

A chemoenzymatic tagging approach was developed and identified eukaryotic host proteins that are O-glycosylated by SetA from Legionella. The SetA-consensus motif was applied to recombinant proteins yielding a site-specific O-glucosylation method.
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A genetics-free method for high-throughput discovery of cryptic microbial metabolites

January 7th, 2019 by Fei Xu

A genetics-free method for high-throughput discovery of cryptic microbial metabolites

A genetics-free method for high-throughput discovery of cryptic microbial metabolites, Published online: 07 January 2019; doi:10.1038/s41589-018-0193-2

A combination of elicitor screening to induce expression of silent biosynthetic gene clusters with imaging mass spectrometry to visualize the resulting metabolome enables the discovery of nine cryptic natural products.
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[ASAP] Novel Methoxymethacrylate Natural Products Uncovered by Statistics-Based Mining of the <italic toggle=”yes”>Myxococcus fulvus</italic> Secondary Metabolome

January 2nd, 2019 by Fabian Panter, Daniel Krug, Rolf Müller

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ACS Chemical Biology
DOI: 10.1021/acschembio.8b00948
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Noncanonical CTD kinases regulate RNA polymerase II in a gene-class-specific manner

December 31st, 2018 by Corey M. Nemec

Noncanonical CTD kinases regulate RNA polymerase II in a gene-class-specific manner

Noncanonical CTD kinases regulate RNA polymerase II in a gene-class-specific manner, Published online: 31 December 2018; doi:10.1038/s41589-018-0194-1

Ten new RNA polymerase II kinases were identified, of these Hrr25 was engineered to enable covalent and noncovalent chemical inhibition in vivo, revealing that this kinase regulates polymerase function at noncoding snoRNA genes.
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Activation of silent biosynthetic gene clusters using transcription factor decoys

December 31st, 2018 by Bin Wang

Activation of silent biosynthetic gene clusters using transcription factor decoys

Activation of silent biosynthetic gene clusters using transcription factor decoys, Published online: 31 December 2018; doi:10.1038/s41589-018-0187-0

Transcription factor decoys, DNA molecules designed to mimic regulatory DNAs and prevent repressors binding to their DNA targets, are used to achieve de-repression of silent biosynthetic gene clusters, resulting in production of new natural products.
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Conducting the CTD orchestra

December 31st, 2018 by Carlos Mario Genes Robles

Conducting the CTD orchestra

Conducting the CTD orchestra, Published online: 31 December 2018; doi:10.1038/s41589-018-0201-6

The carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is post-translationally modified during gene expression. A recent study has identified a CTD kinase, Hrr25, that regulates the termination of noncoding RNA genes by recruiting Rtt103, a key termination factor.