Trans-Acting Arginine Residues in the AAA+ Chaperone ClpB Allosterically Regulate the Activity Through Inter- and Intra-Domain Communication [Molecular Biophysics]

September 24th, 2014 by Zeymer, C., Fischer, S., Reinstein, J.

The molecular chaperone ClpB/Hsp104, a member of the AAA+ superfamily (ATPases associated with various cellular activities), rescues proteins from the aggregated state in collaboration with the DnaK/Hsp70 chaperone system. ClpB/Hsp104 forms a hexameric, ring-shaped complex that functions as a tightly regulated, ATP-powered molecular disaggregation machine. Highly conserved and essential arginine residues, often called arginine fingers, are located at the subunit interfaces of the complex, which also harbor the catalytic sites. Several AAA+ proteins, including ClpB/Hsp104, possess a pair of such trans-acting arginines in the N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD1), both of which were shown to be crucial for oligomerization and ATPase activity. Here, we present a mechanistic study elucidating the role of this conserved arginine pair. First, we found that the arginines couple nucleotide binding to oligomerization of NBD1, which is essential for the activity. Next, we designed a set of covalently linked, dimeric ClpB NBD1 variants, carrying single subunits deficient in either ATP binding or hydrolysis, to study allosteric regulation and inter-subunit communication. Using this well-defined environment of site-specifically modified, cross-linked AAA+ domains, we found that the conserved arginine pair mediates the cooperativity of ATP binding and hydrolysis in an allosteric fashion.
  • Posted in Journal of Biological Chemistry, Publications
  • Comments Off on Trans-Acting Arginine Residues in the AAA+ Chaperone ClpB Allosterically Regulate the Activity Through Inter- and Intra-Domain Communication [Molecular Biophysics]