Impaired O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation in the endoplasmic reticulum by mutated EGF domain-specific O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase found in Adams-Oliver syndrome [Molecular Bases of Disease]

December 8th, 2014 by Ogawa, M., Sawaguchi, S., Kawai, T., Nadano, D., Matsuda, T., Yagi, H., Kato, K., Furukawa, K., Okajima, T.

EGF domain-specific O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (EOGT) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase that acts on EGF domain-containing proteins such as Notch receptors. Recently, mutations in EOGT have been reported in patients with Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS). Here, we have characterized enzymatic properties of mouse EOGT and EOGT mutants associated with AOS. Simultaneous expression of EOGT with Notch1 EGF repeats in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells led to immunoreactivity with the CTD110.6 antibody in the ER. Consistent with the GlcNAc modification in the ER, the enzymatic properties of EOGT are distinct from those of Golgi-resident GlcNAc transferases; the pH optimum of EOGT ranges from 7.0 to 7.5, and the Km value for UDP N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) is 25 μM. Despite the relatively low Km value for UDP-GlcNAc, EOGT-catalyzed GlcNAcylation depends on the hexosamine pathway, as revealed by the increased O-GlcNAcylation of Notch1 EGF repeats upon supplementation with hexosamine, suggesting differential regulation of luminal UDP-GlcNAc concentration in the ER and the Golgi. As compared with wild-type EOGT, O-GlcNAcylation in the ER is nearly abolished in HEK293T cells exogenously expressing EOGT variants associated with AOS. Introduction of the W207S mutation resulted in degradation of the protein via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, although the stability and ER localization of EOGTR377Q were not affected. Importantly, the interaction between UDP-GlcNAc and EOGTR377Q was impaired without adversely affecting acceptor substrate interaction. These results suggest that impaired glycosyltransferase activity in mutant EOGT proteins and the consequent defective O-GlcNAcylation in the ER constitute the molecular basis for AOS.
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