Sequential Actions of SIRT1-RelB-SIRT3 Coordinate Nuclear-Mitochondrial Communication during Immunometabolic Adaptation to Acute Inflammation and Sepsis [Metabolism]

November 17th, 2014 by Liu, T. F., Vachharajani, V., Millet, P., Bharadwaj, M. S., Molina, A. J., McCall, C. E.

We reported that NAD+-dependent SIRT1, RelB, and SIRT6 nuclear proteins in monocytes regulate a switch from the glycolysis-dependent acute inflammatory response to fatty-acid- oxidation-dependent sepsis adaptation. We also found that disrupting SIRT1 activity during adaptation restores immunometabolic homeostasis and rescues septic mice from death. Here, we show that nuclear SIRT1 guides RelB to differentially induce SIRT3 expression and also increases mitochondrial biogenesis, which alters bioenergetics during sepsis adaptation. We constructed this concept using TLR4-stimulated THP1 human promonocytes, a model that mimics the initiation and adaptation stages of sepsis. Following increased expression, mitochondrial SIRT3 deacetylase activates the rate-limiting tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), concomitant with increases in citrate synthase activity. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR) increases early and decreases during adaptation, parallel with modifications to membrane depolarization, ATP generation, and production of mitochondrial superoxide and whole-cell hydrogen peroxide. Evidence of SIRT1-RelB induction of mitochondrial biogenesis included increases in mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial-to-nuclear DNA ratios, and both nuclear and mitochondrial encoded proteins. We confirmed the SIRT-RelB-SIRT3 adaptation link to mitochondrial bioenergetics in both TLR4-stimulated normal and sepsis-adapted human blood monocytes and mouse splenocytes. We also found that SIRT1 inhibition ex vivo reversed the sepsis-induced changes in bioenergetics.
  • Posted in Journal of Biological Chemistry, Publications
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