Role for Tyrosine Phosphorylation of A-kinase Anchoring Protein 8 (AKAP8) in its Dissociation from Chromatin and the Nuclear Matrix [Cell Biology]

March 13th, 2015 by Kubota, S., Morii, M., Yuki, R., Yamaguchi, N., Yamaguchi, H., Aoyama, K., Kuga, T., Tomonaga, T.,

Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation regulates a wide variety of cellular processes at the plasma membrane. Recently, we showed that nuclear tyrosine kinases induce global nuclear structure changes, which we called chromatin structural changes. However, the mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we identify A-kinase anchoring protein 8 (AKAP8/AKAP95), which associates with chromatin and the nuclear matrix, as a nuclear tyrosine-phosphorylated protein. Tyrosine phosphorylation of AKAP8 is induced by several tyrosine kinases, such as Src, Fyn, and c-Abl, but not Syk. Nucleus-targeted Lyn and c-Src strongly dissociate AKAP8 from chromatin and the nuclear matrix in a kinase activity-dependent manner. The levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of AKAP8 are decreased by substitution of multiple tyrosine residues on AKAP8 into phenylalanine. Importantly, the phenylalanine mutations of AKAP8 inhibit its dissociation from nuclear structures, suggesting that the association/dissociation of AKAP8 with/from nuclear structures is regulated by its tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, the phenylalanine mutations of AKAP8 suppress the levels of nuclear tyrosine kinase-induced chromatin structural changes. In contrast, AKAP8 knockdown increases the levels of chromatin structural changes. Intriguingly, stimulation with hydrogen peroxide induces chromatin structural changes, accompanied by the dissociation of AKAP8 from nuclear structures. These results suggest that AKAP8 is involved in the regulation of chromatin structural changes through nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation.
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